Rise of the Technology Class

These conversations are between students from Ecuador, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the US who see technology serving a higher purpose: A counter-culture to their predecessors. This is evidence of a new type of generative class who apply technology to their creativity with art, music, science and involvement within the community. Their activity is transparent and active to our evolving civility. These multinational students are socially conscious storytellers. The Moderator of this conversation, Michael Davis is an Executive MBA graduate of Steinbeis University Germany, The Berlin School of Creative Leadership.

Archive for technology

Salvador – Duel of Titans

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Nokia launches its most advanced mobile, the N97 – and Apple launches the new iPhone 3GS in 75 countries, the third generation iPhone. The N97, is the “crown jewel” of Nokia, the world’s largest manufacturer of mobile devices.

In this world, a very big duel.

But there are many good phones now on the market, very similar to these two mobiles. LG, Blackberry and Samsung have very good touch-screen phones, like the new LG Sand (“LG Arena” in Spanish)

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Veena – business, technology, disease

It seems like most of the time business plays a major role in technology–almost a greater role than technology itself does. Even if we have the technology to create something, if the business community is again it, it will not be created. An example of this is several years ago when electric cars were first introduced in the U.S. Gas companies did not want people to buy the electric cars because it would be bad for their business, so they lobbied and spent money to keep the electric cars from becoming a big thing. Electric cars went out of production here for a very long time because the businesses were against them.

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Another way that business controls technology is in the area of medicine. It is very possible that if it was not for insurance companies and hospitals trying to make money, we could find cures for some of the diseases that are most prevalent right now. However, doctors know that the real money is not in research, but in practice of medicine, and hospitals and insurance companies want people to buy vaccine after vaccine each year for things like the flu or meningitis, instead of finding one cure. I’m pretty sure that a cure hasn’t been discovered for anything since polio. polio vial

Surely we have the technology to cure other diseases, but if the business world is against it, technology doesn’t really have a chance.

Nikolas – Bitter Sweet

To me technology is bitter sweet. It has allowed for great success and has made life easier. On the flip side it has also consumed peoples lives and has, in some ways, made us lazy as a society. I have seen people go crazy without their cell phones and feel like they are missing out on something big whenever they do not have it. Whenever I don’t have my cell phone it is a very liberating feeling and Im not checking something every five minutes. So I love technology and the doors it opens, but I try not to depend on it too much.

Aruna – Bittersweet but connected

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Do we take things for granted? I wonder how students our age who live in underdeveloped countries would feel if they had to all of a sudden use a computer everyday? Or own a TV? OR watch a movie? That we take for granted. We know all about kids in Africa because we are connected. They probably know very little about about us. Let’s invent some way to let them know who we are.

Aruna – Graduating in India

51iQAI3hDL._SL500_I know I’m a little early posting this but thought this is utterly tragic…

Everyone around the world thinks that because there are companies to outsource work here in India, that the mass population are digital geniuses. I am surprised to read the following article. “80% of high school graduates are not readily employable?” How is that possible? Surfing the internet doesn’t obviously get you a job…

“There is a cool program here that has launched a pilot to enable 500 8th through 12th grade students with little or no computer experience to develop and certify digital skills. It is developed by Rotary Club of New Delhi through corporate sponsorship from Intel, Spice Telecom and CyberLearning.

Based on the success of the project, this pilot could be extended to more than 500 schools by as early as July 2009. “Reports indicate that 80 percent of graduates produced by India are not readily employable, so it’s imperative that we start focusing on schools,” said Pankaj Rai, chairman of the Rotary Club of New Delhi Literacy Committee in India. Anil Sharma is a contributing editor for TMCnet. Picture from Cheryl Oakes’s Page.


Joshua – Tweet

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Michael – YTC’s founder Dave Finkel

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