Rise of the Technology Class

These conversations are between students from Ecuador, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the US who see technology serving a higher purpose: A counter-culture to their predecessors. This is evidence of a new type of generative class who apply technology to their creativity with art, music, science and involvement within the community. Their activity is transparent and active to our evolving civility. These multinational students are socially conscious storytellers. The Moderator of this conversation, Michael Davis is an Executive MBA graduate of Steinbeis University Germany, The Berlin School of Creative Leadership.

Archive for school

Nikolas – The Flip-Side

My last two posts have been about the cons of technology and how it is a burden on our society. But then I thought about how it has benefited me in the past. I am a member of a club at my school that fights for peace in Darfur, Sudan, and some of our jobs consist of sponsoring schools, and pressuring the government to take action. Through our resources on-line and through email, we have been able to be a voice for them and pass on there experiences and fulfill there needs. The fact that technology has come this far in communication and has made it possible and easier to have even high school kids make a difference blows my mind and makes me motivated to do more to help and play a roll in the world.

Jacqueline – YTC and Me

Being a part of Youth Technology Corps (www.ytcorps.org) has been one of the greatest experience that I’ve encountered. When I first started, I was a little bit nervous, because I didn’t know what were we really doing and I didn’t think I would be able to do whatever we were going to do. Along the way I’ve learned more and more about what we were doing and also made friends with some new people. Not only did i make some friends from school but I met a lot of really great people from Mexico and Ireland and having the chance to get to know them and learn more about their culture. Meeting new people from other countries and exploring the world of YTC to them. One of the other things we do every year for the program is that we go out to the community and teach young kids how to use some of the computer programs. This experience had taught me better people skills, and better at public speaking. Being apart of this program means so much me and i am proud of being in such a thing.

Aruna – Graduating in India

51iQAI3hDL._SL500_I know I’m a little early posting this but thought this is utterly tragic…

Everyone around the world thinks that because there are companies to outsource work here in India, that the mass population are digital geniuses. I am surprised to read the following article. “80% of high school graduates are not readily employable?” How is that possible? Surfing the internet doesn’t obviously get you a job…

“There is a cool program here that has launched a pilot to enable 500 8th through 12th grade students with little or no computer experience to develop and certify digital skills. It is developed by Rotary Club of New Delhi through corporate sponsorship from Intel, Spice Telecom and CyberLearning.

Based on the success of the project, this pilot could be extended to more than 500 schools by as early as July 2009. “Reports indicate that 80 percent of graduates produced by India are not readily employable, so it’s imperative that we start focusing on schools,” said Pankaj Rai, chairman of the Rotary Club of New Delhi Literacy Committee in India. Anil Sharma is a contributing editor for TMCnet. Picture from Cheryl Oakes’s Page.


Michael – two younger students… tv vs. the computer

presented during a speech by Peter Hirshberg.