Rise of the Technology Class

These conversations are between students from Ecuador, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the US who see technology serving a higher purpose: A counter-culture to their predecessors. This is evidence of a new type of generative class who apply technology to their creativity with art, music, science and involvement within the community. Their activity is transparent and active to our evolving civility. These multinational students are socially conscious storytellers. The Moderator of this conversation, Michael Davis is an Executive MBA graduate of Steinbeis University Germany, The Berlin School of Creative Leadership.

Archive for government

Samantha – Large Hadron Collider from the movie “Angels and Demons”

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A few days ago I went to the movie Angels and Demons and that movie shows a little bit of the function of the “large hadron collider”.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator, intended to collide opposing particle beams.

The Large Hadron Collider was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) with the intention of testing various predictions of high-energy physics, including the existence of the hypothesized ‘Higgs boson.’ It lies in a tunnel 27 kilometres (17 mi) in circumference, as much as 175 metres (570 ft) beneath the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland.

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It is funded by and built in collaboration with over 10,000 scientists and engineers from over 100 countries as well as hundreds of universities and laboratories.

Experimentally verifying the existence of the Higgs boson, the last unobserved particle, would shed light on how particles are thought to acquire their mass.

Expected results:
Once the supercollider is up and running, scientists estimate that a single Higgs boson may be produced every few hours.

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At this rate, it may take up to three years to collect enough data to discover the Higgs boson unambiguously.

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Cristo – Buried in co2 is possible?

Recently, the experts talk of alternatives to meet energy demand worldwide. Some of the names that are mentioned: nuclear, solar, wind, renewable.

And now, the new alternative is to capture and store carbon dioxide.

This technology requires trapping emissions of carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels in power plants and inject it into underground layers of the Earth. It is believed that CO2 emissions from China and India will double by 2030.

According to David King,  if we continue emitting carbon dioxide at current levels we are facing an enormous risk to the planet. Professor King has been an open supporter of nuclear power as a solution to reduce carbon emissions. But now says it is essential that the power plants around the world adopt the technology for storage of CO2. Particularly, he says, in large developing countries such as China, India or Brazil, which inevitably emit huge quantities of CO2 when consumed its huge coal reserves.

“This will be catastrophic, unless we can persuade these countries to catch CO2 emissions at its power plants and stored underground in porous rocks,” said King.

The British government announced it will study the technology being developed by a consortium of energy firms, including British Petroleum, BP.

According to BP, this technology can save the same amount of CO2 that they produce 250,000 cars a year.

Salvador – A World Change

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That´s like a Nikolas_The Flip-Side post comment. Of course. We (young people arround the world) should change the world. We have to eliminate the injustices that there are arround the world, eradicating poverty, ensuring that all we are equal, that people won´t be more rich than other person, no more powerful than other people, no difference between countries, that everyone study on the school. But we must change many things, how we live, think, change the policy, the economy (although that is giving us many problems in all countries of the world, and we continue supporting the economy, I don´t know why) We have to change everything, that not have wars and discrimination, racism or hunger in the world. If we do nothing, we´ll destroy the world. Technology, communication, Internet, media are essential to say to the people “We have to change the world”. It is also necessary to take care of the planet and animals, plants, everything in it, so we need to find a form of development that does not damage the environment, take care, there is a radical change, reinventing everything all the technology and research and create all that we have now but that doesn´t pollute.

Nikolas – The Flip-Side

My last two posts have been about the cons of technology and how it is a burden on our society. But then I thought about how it has benefited me in the past. I am a member of a club at my school that fights for peace in Darfur, Sudan, and some of our jobs consist of sponsoring schools, and pressuring the government to take action. Through our resources on-line and through email, we have been able to be a voice for them and pass on there experiences and fulfill there needs. The fact that technology has come this far in communication and has made it possible and easier to have even high school kids make a difference blows my mind and makes me motivated to do more to help and play a roll in the world.

Aruna – Graduating in India

51iQAI3hDL._SL500_I know I’m a little early posting this but thought this is utterly tragic…

Everyone around the world thinks that because there are companies to outsource work here in India, that the mass population are digital geniuses. I am surprised to read the following article. “80% of high school graduates are not readily employable?” How is that possible? Surfing the internet doesn’t obviously get you a job…

“There is a cool program here that has launched a pilot to enable 500 8th through 12th grade students with little or no computer experience to develop and certify digital skills. It is developed by Rotary Club of New Delhi through corporate sponsorship from Intel, Spice Telecom and CyberLearning.

Based on the success of the project, this pilot could be extended to more than 500 schools by as early as July 2009. “Reports indicate that 80 percent of graduates produced by India are not readily employable, so it’s imperative that we start focusing on schools,” said Pankaj Rai, chairman of the Rotary Club of New Delhi Literacy Committee in India. Anil Sharma is a contributing editor for TMCnet. Picture from Cheryl Oakes’s Page.