Rise of the Technology Class

These conversations are between students from Ecuador, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the US who see technology serving a higher purpose: A counter-culture to their predecessors. This is evidence of a new type of generative class who apply technology to their creativity with art, music, science and involvement within the community. Their activity is transparent and active to our evolving civility. These multinational students are socially conscious storytellers. The Moderator of this conversation, Michael Davis is an Executive MBA graduate of Steinbeis University Germany, The Berlin School of Creative Leadership.

Archive for economy

Michael – “Iran, the cell phone revolution”

6a00d83451c45669e20115701fad26970c-500wiAs the world watches and listens to historic change in Iran, I wonder if the protesters really know how far their media has traveled. Their access to the internet  is blocked. Only a few foreign journalists have been allowed to stay and reporting is limited. The images of young people banded together for a common cause are quite compelling.

For some of the authors on this blog, this is the first massive movement of activism you have noticed with global impact.

Picture 3“You” emerged more than a few years ago as the hero for Time Magazine’s person of the year. (2006) Citizen journalism or “participatory journalism” is not necessarily new by technology timelines.

The dramatic footage sent by mostly young people from Iran tell a story deeper than civil protest. There is no violence in this movie file. Turn up the volume. Listen to the story. This is one long continuous shot from a mobile phone, traveling along the street during protest. It is about technology.  It is their primary link to the outside world for expression. These are authentic stories that have crossed all channels and platforms using all types of media.

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Salvador – A World Change

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That´s like a Nikolas_The Flip-Side post comment. Of course. We (young people arround the world) should change the world. We have to eliminate the injustices that there are arround the world, eradicating poverty, ensuring that all we are equal, that people won´t be more rich than other person, no more powerful than other people, no difference between countries, that everyone study on the school. But we must change many things, how we live, think, change the policy, the economy (although that is giving us many problems in all countries of the world, and we continue supporting the economy, I don´t know why) We have to change everything, that not have wars and discrimination, racism or hunger in the world. If we do nothing, we´ll destroy the world. Technology, communication, Internet, media are essential to say to the people “We have to change the world”. It is also necessary to take care of the planet and animals, plants, everything in it, so we need to find a form of development that does not damage the environment, take care, there is a radical change, reinventing everything all the technology and research and create all that we have now but that doesn´t pollute.

Cristo – Society and Technology

Society has changed a lot in thirty years thanks to technology, which improves living standards (access), but unfortunately not everyone has this level of life. (money)
Responsible use of technology is the most important issue. Uncontrolled use of technology can cause much harm, so I think it is more important to understand the “responsible use of technology.”

Katie – On June 12, 2009, “TV Evolves in the US”

A new era in broadcast television history.
A new era in broadcast television history.

REMINDER: Your Analog TV’s Will Implode At Midnight
The era of analog broadcast television in the United States will end as the nation’s full power* television stations complete their transition to an all-digital system. While this change will mark the end of the traditional analog method of broadcasting over-the-air television, it won’t signal the end of free broadcast television, and your favorite broadcast programs and local television stations will still be available.

Don’t forget your old school analog TV’s will cease receiving over-the-air TV signals come tomorrow unless you score a digital converter box or you receive your television by cable, satellite or built-in HDTV tuner. Congress extended the DTV Transition date from Feburary 17th, 2009 (best day ever might I add) to June 12, 2009 due to the economy and lack of DTV coupons.

It’s your geeky duty to call grandma and inform her that her precious block of Baking With Julia and The Best Of The Joy Of Painting will no longer be filling her noontime cat nap unless she steps up to all digital TV.

Aruna – “eWaste”

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eWaste

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Kaito – Mobile Payment in Tokyo, Thank You.

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In Tokyo we choose to pay for products and food with money or phone credit. We use mobile phone that have RFID. (Radio Frequency Identification) Many stores allow scanning of phone device on the reader. Payment is automatic. On this blog the girl from Ecuador asks “if we replace phone often?” In Japan, some older students do. however, I do not. Too expensive. We buy accessories for phones. Too much accessories. We could buy another phone for all money for items.  I am sorry if this english is broken, I use Google Translate. Please enjoy the video. Thank you.  It is 20 seconds in length.  本当にありがとうございます = Thank you very much

Aruna – Graduating in India

51iQAI3hDL._SL500_I know I’m a little early posting this but thought this is utterly tragic…

Everyone around the world thinks that because there are companies to outsource work here in India, that the mass population are digital geniuses. I am surprised to read the following article. “80% of high school graduates are not readily employable?” How is that possible? Surfing the internet doesn’t obviously get you a job…

“There is a cool program here that has launched a pilot to enable 500 8th through 12th grade students with little or no computer experience to develop and certify digital skills. It is developed by Rotary Club of New Delhi through corporate sponsorship from Intel, Spice Telecom and CyberLearning.

Based on the success of the project, this pilot could be extended to more than 500 schools by as early as July 2009. “Reports indicate that 80 percent of graduates produced by India are not readily employable, so it’s imperative that we start focusing on schools,” said Pankaj Rai, chairman of the Rotary Club of New Delhi Literacy Committee in India. Anil Sharma is a contributing editor for TMCnet. Picture from Cheryl Oakes’s Page.